Brookhaven National Laboratory

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An experimental and theoretical exploration of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) phase diagram. The matter produced in collisions at the highest energies and the smallest baryon chemical potentials can change from quark-gluon plasma (QGP) to a hadron gas through a smooth crossover. But lower energy collisions can access higher baryon chemical potentials where a first-order phase transition line is thought to exist. The reach of the future DOE Basic Energy Sciences program at RHIC is shown, as are the trajectories on the phase diagram followed by the cooling droplets of QGP produced in collisions with varying energy. The present reach of lattice QCD calculations is illustrated by the yellow band. (Illustration: Swagato Mukherjee, Brookhaven National Laboratory.)

Early-universe soup

June 22nd, 2016 Updated: June 22nd, 2016

ORNL’s Titan supercomputer is helping Brookhaven physicists understand the matter that formed microseconds after the Big Bang.


Since 2000, RHIC – for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider – has pushed gold ions to near-light speeds around a 2.4-mile racetrack at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This is an image from the collider's Star detector.

A smashing success

December 30th, 2014 Updated: December 30th, 2014

The world’s particle colliders unite to share and analyze massive volumes of data.


A model of a nanocluster comprised of 11 gold atoms with attached ligand atoms. (Yan Li, Brookhaven National Laboratory.)

Quantum gold

September 12th, 2013 Updated: September 12th, 2013

Driven by what’s missing in experiments, Brookhaven’s Yan Li applies quantum mechanics to compute the physical properties of materials.



Seeing beyond 3-D

December 28th, 2011 Updated: May 2nd, 2016

High-dimensional visualization techniques at Stony Brook and Brookhaven are helping reveal the interactions that drive climate and other complexities.


A frame from a WRF, or weather research and forecasting model, that shows an area over Oklahoma where the FASTER fast-cloud physics project will be put to the test.

In climate modeling, speed matters

November 10th, 2010 Updated: November 30th, 2011

A Brookhaven team wants to build the ‘fast physics’ behind clouds, air-suspended particles and precipitation into global climate models.


Going big to study small

March 1st, 2010 Updated: March 16th, 2011

It takes a big computer to model very small things. And, like its namesake state, New York Blue is big. Made up of 36,864 processors, the massively parallel IBM Blue Gene/L is housed at DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on New York’s Long Island, where, among other things, it’s used to model quantum dots, or […]